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dewalt router and grooving for frame and panel doors
January 30, 2015
6:10 pm
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Ness

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Thanks for this information April.

A small table saw for any wood working endeavor is an invaluable asset and this one looks great.

It’s certainly one of the best investments to make quickly for any serious amateur.

I have a biggish workshop with a heavy fixed table saw but would have loved a portable one for on site work.

All the best,

Ness

January 29, 2015
8:12 am
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April Boisvert

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Makita 2705 10-Inch Contractor Table Saw is the best brand of table saw known to me so far. This is a really top class saw. However for some reason the scale didn’t line up. Given that I only read the instructions as a last resort this is probably operator error. Once it is finetuned , it work just like a charm . I use it in my garage for building furnitures .The Fence was a little loose but after i tuned it, it was just fine.Just love it !

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Stefan
July 22, 2014
8:19 pm
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terry

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Thanks Ness………thats ingenious use of that tool. I don’t have a biscuit joiner either but thanks for showing that process as I find people using power tools in a way that they weren’t necessarily designed for interesting.

Ive watched quite a few of your workshop videos Ness…..find them interesting (even the ones that don’t apply to the kind of work I do) so I hop they keep coming.

All the best

 

Terry

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April Boisvert
July 22, 2014
6:26 pm
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Ness

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Hi everyone,

Just a thought, if you’ve got a biscuit jointer it’s very easy to make it cut grooves for backs panels etc.

Take a look at this video to show you how to do it.

Ness

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terry
July 22, 2014
5:36 pm
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terry

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Cheers Jim

Saw most of this on the other thread a minute ago. Thanks for taking the time to share. Ive watched some Peter Parfitt stuff on youtube……he is also a festool nut and a very pleasant enthusiastic bloke and he swears by the UJK router stuff. 

Now iv’e got to add that to all the festool stuff!!!!Yell

 

Tel

July 22, 2014
4:56 pm
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jimbouk

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July 21, 2014
10:34 pm
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terry

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Cheers

Yeah ive seen its all possible on Polyboard and I want to make them the ‘proper’ way eventually. Great stuff. Look forward to coming back to this thread when the right job comes in. In the meantime I shall do some research on the things you mention….see If i can find the time/funds to knock up a basic table to bench it.

Thanks for showing an interest 

terry

July 21, 2014
10:26 pm
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mark nichols


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Terry

You can get a mounting plate from trend or axminster and knock up a MDF or melamine faced MDF table real quick. Stile and rail cutter from axminster or wealden tools, make up a basic fence and away you go..

You will even be able to do a cutlist for the whole lot within Polyboard giving the exact rebates and tenon lengths. I am even doing them now with the centre panel oversized perfectly on the cutting list.

Mark

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terry
July 21, 2014
10:18 pm
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terry

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Thanks Mark

The way I see it……I have a router I’d like to learn to use it and I know these doors can be done with one so Im keen to learn. Ive heard them done on a spindle moulder…that seems the most efficient way. That said I can see quite a few other uses to the router eventually so Im keen to get it benched perhaps and start playing with it properly. Im not very confident with it….as I said Ive only done kitchen mitres with it in a jig.

Thanks again

terry

July 21, 2014
10:05 pm
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mark nichols


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Hi Terry.

I like Jim avoided mentioning dominos. The 6mm fillets work, we do this sometimes.

Router and fillets work for ease a bearing guide would help.

To be fair, we use a spindle moulder for doors, but that doesn’t help you.

A simple router table would be ideal and safer that hand work. You can even knock one up simply.

My son does doors on the table saw as he hates routers almost as much as the spindle moulder and he isn’t even old enough to remember French Blocks ( sorry Ness) without retaining pins.

I’ll see if I can do a drawing.

Mark

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terry
July 21, 2014
9:19 pm
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jimbouk

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Yeah thats true that would work. I would domino them but didnt mention it as i know you dont have one but biscuiting them would do well. 

Also use moisture resistant mdf for everything. Easier to finish and machine the normal stuff is rubbish. 

July 21, 2014
8:54 pm
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terry

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Ive seen pictures of guys make them with just 6mm offcuts (same as panel thickness) and biscuits to join the rail to the style.

I hope that doesn’t sound silly, but im sure ive seen that done. Not sure I know what Im on about!!

I’d like to see how people do them though.

 

Terry

July 21, 2014
8:47 pm
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terry

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thanks jim

No don’t have a table saw as Ive got a tracksaw/guide rails and didnt really see the need (or the funds) to have both. Ive only been asked to do them on bigger doors a couple of times, but Im targetting more victorian properties now and I think its something I need  to get under my belt…..the proper way.

I not that comfortable with a router yet…….but was just wondering if the router is the best way of doing them….ive seen people mention other ways of doing them on other woodworking forums.

They don’t seem that hard if youve got the right machinery and a bit of help.

 

Cheers

 

terry

July 21, 2014
8:38 pm
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jimbouk

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Terry,

If you get a slot cutter with bearing no need to bench it. I would set a spare strip parallel and same thickness to the bit your routing to help stop the router tipping side to side. Do it on a nice flat surface and in one slow run and you should get a nice result.

Sort of gos without saying but make sure all clamped down well. 

The more tricky bit is doing the end of the rails. Ie the tennon that gos into that goove of the side stile.

If have a table saw with sliding bed its easy or if you have a table saw with a sliding square not too bad. Just set the blad to the depth you need and run over mulriple times to trim it out. 

Or slightly more tricky is to run it over the blade end on to make the tennon. You would need to make a jig for this really.

No idea on the courses. But i will try to illustrate what i mean in the next day or 2.

Jim

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terry
July 21, 2014
8:13 pm
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terry

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BTW ive never used a router benched before. I am considering a basic course 2 day offered by trend/axminster type of thing. Does anyone have any opinions if they are worth it. Or can you teach yourself.

I dont want to lose any fingers!

Terry

July 21, 2014
8:08 pm
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terry

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Has anyone got any experience in making frame and panel doors. Nothing fancy no raised panels just 18mm mdf for the frame 6mm for the panels. I know there is a cheats way with overplanting the stiles rails but i’d like to be able to make them the ‘proper’ way eventually by grooving in the frame.

Ive got a dewalt 624 router which I have only ever used to cut kitchen masons mitres. 

My questions are 

What type of bit for the router to do the grooves?

Do I need to bench the router? I don’t have a router table. Or can I cut the grooves without a router table.

Can anyone point me in a direction of how to make these doors properly with stopped grooves and using 6mm splines where the rails/stiles meet

In time I would also like to see a video of how to set up polyboard to construct/dimension the components?

Ive used the overplant/ applied stuck method before many times on small doors for cabinets but im reluctant to use this method on bigger wardrobe doors for fear of warping etc.

Terry

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